Self-Publishing & Trade Publishing Are Not Mutually Exclusive Paths

There was one thing that stuck out like a sore thumb amidst all the huffing and puffing surrounding Barry Eisler’s decision to sign with Amazon’s new imprint, Thomas & Mercer. Some people (both indie evangelists and arch-defenders of trade publishing), think that self-publishing and trade publishing are mutually exclusive paths. This nonsense needs to be dealt with right away. First off, there are many, many people who have trade deals who are also self-publishing other titles.

Self-Publishing & Trade Publishing Are Not Mutually Exclusive Paths

There was one thing that stuck out like a sore thumb amidst all the huffing and puffing surrounding Barry Eisler’s decision to sign with Amazon’s new imprint, Thomas & Mercer. Some people (both indie evangelists and arch-defenders of trade publishing), think that self-publishing and trade publishing are mutually exclusive paths. This nonsense needs to be dealt with right away. First off, there are many, many people who have trade deals who are also self-publishing other titles.

Publishers Skinning Authors, Eisler & Konrath, and The Never-Ending Blog Tour

I have to spend the day hauling giant loads of copper, chemicals, and silicone (don’t ask), so if you don’t mind, I will do a quick news round-up, and talk about some stuff appearing here and elsewhere in the coming days. Publishers & Agents Trying to Skin Their Authors The Passive Voice is my new favourite blog (thanks to Dean Wesley Smith). He provides excellent overviews of the disruptive changes occurring in publishing, and as a former lawyer, he is especially strong on how publishers are introducing worrying provisions in contracts, attempting to tie-up rights they haven’t paid for.

Publishers Skinning Authors, Eisler & Konrath, and The Never-Ending Blog Tour

I have to spend the day hauling giant loads of copper, chemicals, and silicone (don’t ask), so if you don’t mind, I will do a quick news round-up, and talk about some stuff appearing here and elsewhere in the coming days. Publishers & Agents Trying to Skin Their Authors The Passive Voice is my new favourite blog (thanks to Dean Wesley Smith). He provides excellent overviews of the disruptive changes occurring in publishing, and as a former lawyer, he is especially strong on how publishers are introducing worrying provisions in contracts, attempting to tie-up rights they haven’t paid for.

Nothing To Do With The Champions League Final

There will be no posting this weekend. I am a little behind schedule in cleaning up Let’s Get Digital, Digital, and I would like to catch up. Blogging will resume Monday. I hope you don’t mind, it means you will get your free e-book quicker. I refuse to comment on suggestions that this has anything to do with the Champions League Final between Manchester United and Barcelona this evening, and the related drinking binge that will accompany our inevitable victory, or any betting relating to the outcome of said result. If you want something to read, you can find out what scares me, and you can try this wonderful story by Ian Watson on working with Stanley Kubrick.

Indie Publishing For International Writers, Step 8: Pricing Strategies

This is the eight part of my continuing series INDIE PUBLISHING FOR INTERNATIONAL WRITERS, a step-by-step guide to getting your stories into (digital) print. I’ll be doing each step with you, learning as you do, because I’ve never done this before either. I will be compiling all these steps into a free e-book for my blog-readers when I am done. Step 8: Pricing Strategies There is a lot of debate about pricing. Today, I want to avoid a discussion of the ethics of various strategies. Instead, I would like to talk about their respective pros and cons for the writer employing them.

The Third Way – Barry Eisler Signs Trade Deal With Amazon

In a move announced yesterday at BookExpo America, Barry Eisler has signed a trade deal with Amazon’s newest imprint Thomas & Mercer. Full details of the deal have yet to emerge, but Eisler stated that the advance was “comparable” to the trade deal he walked away from. He also stated that print royalty terms will be similar, but that he will receive “close to” 70% e-book royalties and retain creative control. He also stated that the contract was the most “author friendly” he had ever seen and that he signed straight away.

E-Reader War Heats Up and Amazon Launch New Imprints

Now that Transfection has flown the net, we can get back to business. Tomorrow, I will continue my free guide to self-publishing with a section on pricing. Today, I want to look at some of the big news stories of the last week or so. The E-Reader War Hots Up On Monday, Canadian upstart Kobo launched a new touchscreen e-reader for the tasty price of $129.99. It only weighs 200 grams (take that, iPad!) and uses the same e-ink technology as the Kindle (easy on the eyes, can be read in sunlight). It can store up to 1,000 books (and can be expanded to 30,000 with memory cards).

Transfection Spreads Across The Planet! (Competition)

To celebrate the release of my latest short story – Transfection – I am giving away TWENTY-FIVE free copies of my new e-book. It has already hit the Science Fiction Short Story Bestseller charts in the UK and America, and with a little push, it could go even higher. Seeing as it’s an old-school science fiction story about a scientist who becomes dangerously obsessed with his research, the competition is going to be a little experiment. We’re going to see how far we can get Transfection to spread across the planet, using social media.

Why Traditional Publishers Will Go The Way Of Travel Agents

Over the last six weeks or so, we have examined the various aspects of the publishing industry, and assessed how the different parts are functioning (or in most cases, malfunctioning) in the face of the changes brought about by the internet. As any travel agent will tell you (if you can find one), the internet is an unstoppable force which revolutionizes every single business it comes into contact with. In publishing, change hasn’t seemed as quick, but the internet has been quietly eating away at all the pillars of traditional publishing.

Sample Sunday: TRANSFECTION – Old-school sci-fi by David Gaughran

This week’s Sample Sunday offering is from my latest e-book – Transfection – an old school sci-fi technothriller about a molecular biologist who makes a startling discovery which threatens his life. I have printed the first section of the story below. If you like this sample and want to buy the rest, it’s available from Amazon, Amazon UK, and Smashwords for $0.99/69p. It was only released yesterday, but it want straight into the Science Fiction Short Story Charts at #14. (The post announcing the release is here.) I hope you enjoy it.

Transfection Released Across The World

My second release – Transfection – is a technothriller with old-school sci-fi undertones. A molecular biologist is on the run, but he doesn’t know who wants him dead… or why. I only uploaded Transfection a couple of hours ago, but it’s already for sale on Amazon! For only $0.99! Here’s a quick taste of what you get for $0.99: Molecular biologist Dr. Carl Peters is under pressure on two fronts: his research grants are disappearing and his marriage is falling apart. But when medical researchers discover that genetically modified animal feed has tainted the food chain, he finally gets the funding he always dreamed of. Dr. Peters discovers the reason behind the cancer link with GM food, but it’s so crazy, he Read More…

Amazon: E-books Outselling All Print & Ad-Supported Kindle Is Top-Seller

On the same day that the American Association of Publishers (AAP) announced a rebound for print in March, and that e-books had dropped back to third place (behind trade paperback and hardback), Amazon declared that they were now selling more e-books than print books. Yesterday, I covered the limitations of the AAP figures, namely that they only include a small number of publishing houses, they ignore more e-focused small and independent presses, and they don’t include self-publishers.

Amazon: E-books Outselling All Print & Ad-Supported Kindle Is Top-Seller

On the same day that the American Association of Publishers (AAP) announced a rebound for print in March, and that e-books had dropped back to third place (behind trade paperback and hardback), Amazon declared that they were now selling more e-books than print books. Yesterday, I covered the limitations of the AAP figures, namely that they only include a small number of publishing houses, they ignore more e-focused small and independent presses, and they don’t include self-publishers.