Why Giving Away Thousands Of Free Books Is A Good Thing

While on the surface the following may seem to be a KDP Select success story, it’s actually something a little more important than that: a testament to the power of determination, and proof that even the most niche of books can be a self-publishing success story, a book that every agent in the UK said there was no market for. I first met Tony James Slater at a conference almost exactly two years ago. Given that it was quite a, cough, liquid affair, neither of us remember much about the encounter, other than we were both in a similar position: we had a finished book with which were desperately trying (and failing) to elicit interest. And we were both getting knocked Read More…

Print Editions, Mailing Lists, Special Offers, Donations & Ad Spots

A number of questions have been popping up by email and in the comments – topics I’ve alluded to here but haven’t gone into much detail. I’m going to run through them quickly today: print editions, mailing lists/newsletters, running a sale, PayPal donations, and ad spots on reader sites and book blogs. Let’s Get Physical As you might have guessed by the above pic, my first print edition has been foisted onto the world. If any of you are interested in purchasing A Storm Hits Valparaiso in paperback, North American readers can get it from Amazon (those in the US can also purchase from Barnes & Noble), and international readers are advised to buy from The Book Depository (who are excellent), Read More…

Print Editions, Mailing Lists, Special Offers, Donations & Ad Spots

A number of questions have been popping up by email and in the comments – topics I’ve alluded to here but haven’t gone into much detail. I’m going to run through them quickly today: print editions, mailing lists/newsletters, running a sale, PayPal donations, and ad spots on reader sites and book blogs. Let’s Get Physical As you might have guessed by the above pic, my first print edition has been foisted onto the world. If any of you are interested in purchasing A Storm Hits Valparaiso in paperback, North American readers can get it from Amazon (those in the US can also purchase from Barnes & Noble), and international readers are advised to buy from The Book Depository (who are excellent), Read More…

Amazon Is Creating Competition, Not Killing It

The big topic (again) seems to be whether Amazon is a monopoly, or is heading in that direction, and whether they should be “stopped” (although, I’m never quite sure what that entails exactly). Barry Eisler dealt with this fear, rather conclusively, back in October in a guest post on Joe Konrath’s blog. But lately, the hysteria has been ratcheted up a notch by Mike Shatzkin’s sensible prediction that Amazon will soon be responsible for 50% of most publisher’s sales (I can’t link to Mike’s original piece at the moment, there seems to be a problem with his site, but Passive Guy quotes the main points). The Author’s Guild now has Amazon firmly in their sights. An article at the end of Read More…

Comprehensive Self-Publishing Survey – Please Participate!

The average self-publisher sells 100 books. Or is it 200? And is that in a year? Or is it over the lifetime of the book? The problem is, we have no idea at all, no way of measuring how we are doing. Any “hard” numbers we have about self-publishing are either hopelessly out of date, or use (very) imperfect measures, such as the number of ISBNs registered in a given year, and then number of print editions bearing those ISBNs sold in outlets captured by Neilsen Bookscan. This is problematic for a number of reasons. The most glaring is that a self-publisher could sell thousands and thousands of books without every getting an ISBN or creating a print edition (and Read More…

A Straight Writer of Gay Romance? Interview With Swedish Author Niklas Leavy

I first met Niklas Leavy just over a year ago. At the time, I was still querying, and he was working on a book – hitting me for information on US agents and how to approach them. Niklas had some success on the traditional path, but that was in Sweden (and writing in Swedish). This time he was writing in English, and that publication credit wasn’t going to open too many doors in Manhattan. Fast forward one year, and Niklas has self-published his first book in English. As you will see from the interview below, his situation is quite unique. I spoke with Niklas over a few days in Google Docs, and I think you will find this very interesting. *** Read More…