Amazon: E-books Outselling All Print & Ad-Supported Kindle Is Top-Seller

On the same day that the American Association of Publishers (AAP) announced a rebound for print in March, and that e-books had dropped back to third place (behind trade paperback and hardback), Amazon declared that they were now selling more e-books than print books. Yesterday, I covered the limitations of the AAP figures, namely that they only include a small number of publishing houses, they ignore more e-focused small and independent presses, and they don’t include self-publishers.

Amazon: E-books Outselling All Print & Ad-Supported Kindle Is Top-Seller

On the same day that the American Association of Publishers (AAP) announced a rebound for print in March, and that e-books had dropped back to third place (behind trade paperback and hardback), Amazon declared that they were now selling more e-books than print books. Yesterday, I covered the limitations of the AAP figures, namely that they only include a small number of publishing houses, they ignore more e-focused small and independent presses, and they don’t include self-publishers.

AAP Figures Released: E-Books Keep on Truckin’ But Print Isn’t Dead Yet

The American Association of Publishers (AAP) have released their figures for March. The headline figures were that e-books grew 145.7% year-on-year from March 2010 (in revenue terms), and print bounced back after a terrible start to the year, with two categories showing gains. Adult Hardcover was up 6% year-on-year and Adult Mass Market Paperback grew 1.2%. Adult Trade Paperback fell 7.7%. Despite that drop, Adult Trade Paperback was the #1 selling format at $115.9m, followed by Adult Hardback at $96.6m, e-books at $69m, and Adult Mass Market Paperback at $55.2m.

Stop Fighting It, E-book Dominance Is Inevitable

I have a confession to make. I’ve never really liked hardbacks. Now, don’t get me wrong. I like looking at them. I like touching them. I like holding them. I think they are beautiful objects. I just don’t like reading from them, they are cumbersome, heavy, uncomfortable to read when lying down, and difficult to lug from place to place. And they are expensive. The cloth cover, acid-free paper, and pristine dust-jacket all cost money. When the publisher factors in storage, delivery, and returns, as well as all those free copies for reviewers and promotions, there are a lot of costs they have to pass on to the reader.

Money's Too Tight To Mention

So far we have talked about some of the challenges facing the publishing industry, not least those poised by the digital revolution.  This time I want to talk about money: royalty rates and advances. Royalty Rates. People often ask how much money a writer makes, per copy sold.  The short answer is, not much (and as you will see below, it’s the wrong question).  I think it would be useful to show how the money you hand over for your books is divvied up.

Money’s Too Tight To Mention

So far we have talked about some of the challenges facing the publishing industry, not least those poised by the digital revolution.  This time I want to talk about money: royalty rates and advances. Royalty Rates. People often ask how much money a writer makes, per copy sold.  The short answer is, not much (and as you will see below, it’s the wrong question).  I think it would be useful to show how the money you hand over for your books is divvied up.